Tell Obama right now: Hands off Edward Snowden! Let the political asylum process go forward without interference.
One of my favorite books from one of our most featured architects. Sarah Nettleton’s The Simple Home: The Luxury of Enough. This is the book for those seeking a simple lifestyle. The Simple Home features over 20 homes and show six different ways of creating a home that is both simple and elegant. The book aims to help sort out the necessity of what is in a home.
Another thing to note about this book, it is not just a photo book, the text is really where this book is at. Very clear and simple, but with a strong message. 

One of my favorite books from one of our most featured architects. Sarah Nettleton’s The Simple Home: The Luxury of Enough. This is the book for those seeking a simple lifestyle. The Simple Home features over 20 homes and show six different ways of creating a home that is both simple and elegant. The book aims to help sort out the necessity of what is in a home.

Another thing to note about this book, it is not just a photo book, the text is really where this book is at. Very clear and simple, but with a strong message. 

Pine Lake Cabin

Here is another great example from Sarah Nettleton Architects. They seem to meld new additions into the original structure seamlessly. They do this and improve daylighting throughout the cabin. Morning light reflects from the lake and lights the ceiling of the screened in porch.

In addition to the main cabin, Sarah Nettleton Architects remodeled the “upstairs” cabin which functions as a small guest cabin. They also designed a studio and a boathouse for the lake property. The property is connected between the structures with a path that provides stunning viewpoints and leads to a log gazebo in the orchard. Sounds nice.

Just Because It is Made of Logs…

Just because it is made of logs does not mean it is a cabin.

From: http://www.fastcodesign.com/1669032/bigs-log-cabin-for-the-21st-century-twists-like-a-jenga-stack

Tofte Cabin

When the existing 50-year old Tofte cabin was rebuilt, sustainable building materials and mechanical systems were used to help reduce energy consumption and waste. The owners requested that the design was built with nature sensitive to the environment. They were clear that they wanted “an earth friendly home”. A home which produced zero waste, site destruction, or the needless energy consumption that such projects usually generate. Enter renowned architect Sarah Nettleton, and a team of builders and consultants to meet the challenge. Through innovation, ingenuity,  and persistence, they succeeded in creating this simple, elegant space that respects the history and natural surrounds of the site.

A University of Minnesota Case Study highlights the builds environmental performance. The study notes the various effective energy use solutions including:

  • The shape and design of the building
  • The overall footprint of the structure
  • Lighting
  • Orientation
  • Passive heating and cooling strategies
  • Renewable Energy Systems

The design of the buildings overall shape fed into the clients needs for health and comfort. This lead to the strategies for natural ventilation, indoor air quality, and daylighting. As the project progressed, a theme that is common in architect Sarah Nettleton’s work presented: simplicity.

The cabins footprint only grew by 3%, however it maintained its position. leaving the cabin surrounded by trees and still enabling it to connect with its natural surroundings. The cabins views, still remained focused on the lake.

To let more light into the cabin the architect chose to raise the roof, then turn, and finally split it. This allowed the space to be a warmly lit, but carefully modeled. Sarah Nettleton Architects described the outside of the home as a wave pattern while the interior ceiling speaks to the historic character of the region. The walls were heavily insulated and built tight to provide a wall depth that enhances the quality of light in the home. The placement of the windows provides connectivity, enhances the views and the feeling of being in nature.

Lighting strategies: Sarah Nettleton Architects worked to develope lighting concepts and models. This modeling for daylighting scenarios helped them to design window and wall placement for effective daylighting and natural ventilation. The windows on the south side allowed the public space to increase the amount light let in as well as gain light into the bedrooms. The placement windows closer eye level gave the rooms provided views of Lake Superior and more light. Shading of the structure comes from overhangs and existing tree canopy.

Passive heating and cooling strategies: Insulation and a tight building along with well placed windows allowed the home to keep the heat gained during the day from the sunlight. The placement of windows allows for better cooling, from cross ventilation as well as the vertical exhausting of warmer air out of the ceiling windows.

Building Orientation: South

Engery System Details

Solar system description and size: 8.2kW, 415 sf. Building Integrated PV on garage at 35 degrees

Wind system description and size: 3kW Jacobs Longcase on a 90 ft. tower, 14 ft. rotor diameter

Date installation was completed: 2000

System designer: Robert Erb, Solar Design Associates

Estimated amount of energy delivered by system: 11.2kW; 11,000kWh/yr; 49.95 KBtu/sf/yr

Percent of building’s total energy use provided by solar/wind: 90%

For more information about this cabin check out the cabin architect.